Murphy Lab Researchers Identify Novel Approach to Create Red Blood Cells, Platelets In Vitro

A study led by Boston University School of Medicine has identified a novel approach to create an unlimited number of human red blood cells and platelets in vitro. In collaboration with Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and Boston Medical Center (BMC), the researchers differentiated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into these cell types, which are typically obtained through blood donations. This finding could potentially reduce the need for blood donations to treat patients requiring blood transfusions and could help researchers examine novel therapeutic targets to treat a variety of diseases, including sickle cell disease.  Published online in the journal Blood, the study was led by George J. Murphy, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at BUSM and co-director of the Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) at Boston University and BMC and performed in collaboration with David Sherr, PhD, a professor in environmental health at BUSM and BUSPH.

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Shirley Nah presenting her data at BU Evan’s Day

Sarah Rozelle presents her work to past and present NIH directors

Sarah Rozelle Presents at the 18th Annual Switching Meeting


Sarah Rozelle, a 3rd year graduate student in the Murphy Lab was selected to give an oral presentation of her work at the 18th annual Globin Switching meeting held at the Asilomar Conference Center, Monterey, CA.

Murphy Lab Receives New NIH Grant

Boston University researchers, led by Drs. George J. Murphy and Martin Steinberg, have developed a way to test treatments for sickle cell disease – a genetic disorder of the blood – by working with pluripotent stem cells grown from a small amount of the patient’s own blood.  Click on the picture to link to the full article.

Amy Leung wins Research Award

Amy Leung, Ph.D, a postdoctoral fellow in the Murphy Lab was awarded a prestigious research award following the presentation of her work at the International Symposium on Amyloidosis in Groningen, The Netherlands, 6-10 May 2012.

CReM Directors Profiled in Bostonia

More Than Just Skin Deep:  Read more about the CReM Directors by clicking on this link…

Murphy Lab Awarded Amyloidosis Foundation Grant

“Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Modeling of Human Hereditary Amyloidosis”
This project will generate a new form of stem cells that start out as skin or blood cells but are then reprogrammed into cells that have the ability to become any type of tissue in the body. These stem cells will be utilized to study a genetic disease through the directed differentiation of these cells in vitro in order to recapitulate the outcome of the disease. Possible benefits of this research are new ways to study treatments for genetic diseases such as familial amyloidosis.

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Dr. Murphy chosen as an American Society of Hematology Scholar

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